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the new york times: The Right School Can Make All the Difference for a Child With Disabilities

Evie carpenter

Evie carpenter

I aimed my butt toward what had to be the tiniest chair on the planet and tried to focus on what my daughter’s preschool teacher was saying. The topic of the meeting: kindergarten placement for Sophie.

Sophie has Down syndrome. A third 21st chromosome makes her just a little bit (and sometimes a lot) different from the rest of us. People with Down syndrome typically have delays in fine and gross motor skills, as well as speech issues, and always some level of intellectual disability.


KJZZ/NPR: Sand Dollars: Heading off to college means big changes for a child. And even bigger adjustments for the parents

Amy Silverman's daughter, Annabelle, on the beach in San Diego.

Amy Silverman's daughter, Annabelle, on the beach in San Diego.

I went hunting for sand dollars this summer.

Walking along the beach one evening just before sunset, I stared hard as the foamy tide pulled back, but all I saw were tiny clamshells. Not even a piece of a sand dollar. It felt like a sign. Then again, everything feels like a sign these days.


THE GUARDIAN: Changing more than pronouns: a non-binary teen fights education laws

Cassidy Araiza/The Guardian

Cassidy Araiza/The Guardian

Santi Ceballos worked to change Arizona’s curriculum laws that focused sex education on heterosexuality and left them out.

Sometimes, other kids call Santi “it”.

“It’s sort of like treating me as a different species,” said Santi Ceballos, who goes by they/them pronouns, looking straight into the camera for a video produced by the Southern Arizona Gender Alliance last year. The video was made in an effort to educate others about what it means to be gender nonconforming.


LENNY LETTER: FAYE AND ME

ILLUSTRATION BY TIANXING WAN

ILLUSTRATION BY TIANXING WAN

As the mother of a child with Down Syndrome, I found myself in Faye, a woman decades older than me who chose to institutionalize her developmentally disabled children.

My mother tells a story about a phone call she’ll never forget. It was the summer of 1966. She was several months pregnant with her first child (me), biding her time by the pool of the Phoenix apartment complex where she and my dad were living. Her due date wasn’t till November, but they’d already picked out both boy and girl names.


PHOENIX NEW TIMES: Vintage John McCain: Dead at 81, He Was America's Senator, Not Arizona's

Note: This piece just won first place for general feature in the 2019 Society for Features Journalism Awards.

Gino Santa Maria

Gino Santa Maria

John McCain rubbed his hands together a lot.

He did it all the time — on the U.S. Senate floor, during campaign events, standing around — hands cradled, moving. It wasn’t a casual gesture. You could tell he was putting some force into it.


PHOENIX MAGAZINE: Raising Phoenix: How Amy Silverman Fell in Love with Phoenix

Illustration by Laura Spalding Best

Illustration by Laura Spalding Best

Until Laura Spalding Best came along, I never would have called my street beautiful.

Mind you, I love my sweet, cluttered home. It’s the surrounding Tempe neighborhood that always left me a little cold, despite qualities that most people would describe as “charming”: irrigated lots, big trees and quirky old houses, with Frank Lloyd Wright’s ASU Gammage auditorium just a short stroll away.


 
 

“Silverman’s fierce account of coming to terms with having a child with Down syndrome is at once precise, mordant, and compassionate, and ultimately is exquisitely human.”

— Julie Lythcott-Haims, New York Times bestselling
author of How to Raise an Adult